Adventure Travel

Category: Adventurers & Explorers (Page 1 of 14)

Watch what happened when 20 ordinary people came together for a 300km dog sledding expedition across Arctic Scandinavia in April 2023

Fjällräven Polar is an annual expedition developed to show that with the right knowledge, equipment, and support, anyone can learn to appreciate nature and become an Arctic explorer.

Read more about the Fjällräven Polar 2023 expedition.

The unlikeliest expedition on Earth | Fjällräven Polar 2023

Note: Clicking the above image will load and play the video from YouTube.

Hand cyclist Kevin Mills is the first quadriplegic person to cross the country by pedalling 8,400 kilometres with his arms and shoulders

Globe and Mail »

Alongside his cycling partner and trainer, Nikki Davenport, Mr. Mills’s journey began on May 24 at Canada’s most easterly point of land, the Cape Spear Lighthouse in Newfoundland. By the time the pair reached Victoria’s Ogden Point Breakwater Lighthouse on Saturday, his customized bike was in rough shape.

“It’s pretty beat up. The brakes are just about done. But it made it,” said Mr. Mills, who is 43 and from Newmarket, Ont.

All along the route, they were met with unrelenting kindness – from roadside cheers and meals from strangers, to the private donors who helped get him back on the road when the devastating theft of his specially adapted bike in Quebec City almost derailed the endeavour.

How overlanders are ruining overlanding in Norway (and elsewhere)

Kasper Høglund, a Norwegian who lives full-time in his Land Rover and works as a photographer, steps up and calls out overlanders how are driving off road in Norway, which is not permitted and illegal.

Unfortunately, the problem of overlanders (and others) not taking responsibility for their actions, and being short sighted, are ruining it for most everyone else.

As Kasper puts it in his video description »

There’s been a growing issue with more and more roads closed off for travel in Norway the last years. And throughout my traveling up north this summer a lot of my former favourite spots was now closed for good.

Apps like Park4Night and social media presence from people doing illegal and stupid driving over here is making the overland scene tougher for everyone.

For years I’ve never done anything but kindly reminding people about the strict off road laws in Norway. But these two guys pushed to limit enough to piss off locals enough to contact me directly to address this.

These guys with over a hundred thousand people following them and million of views does have a huge impact to a small town with a few hundred people living in it.

If you agree with him, follow and support Kasper (and others) who are doing what’s right before selfish a**holes ruin it for everyone.

How Overlanders are Ruining Overlanding

Note: Clicking the above image will load and play the video from YouTube.

Traditional three-masted schooner to retrace round-the-world voyage of Charles Darwin’s Beagle

The Guardian »

On Monday 14 August, when the tide is right, an antique sailing ship will manoeuvre through the lock of Plymouth’s historic Sutton harbour and point herself south-west towards the Canary Islands. It will be the start of a two-year voyage around the world taking in 32 ports and involving thousands of people in a groundbreaking geographical project, Darwin200, which aims, among other things, to inspire the environmental leaders and scientists of the future.

Not only that, adventurous souls can apply to be part of the crew on epic voyages between, for example, Tahiti and the Cook Islands, or Cape Town and the Falklands.

The Oosterschelde, a traditional three-masted Dutch schooner, plans to retrace the route taken by another historic ship almost two centuries ago. In Plymouth on Boxing Day 1831, a young man boarded HMS Beagle and the following day set out on a voyage that would change our world. Not that the 22-year-old Charles Darwin suspected the vast significance the voyage would later have. He was suffering a little of what would later be known as impostor syndrome, wondering if he deserved the opportunity given. Fortunately for us, however, he had the necessary determination and enthusiasm. And that is what Darwin200 founder Stewart McPherson hopes will be the legacy of this project. “We are identifying 200 young naturalists from 200 countries who will become the leaders of the future – young people who can drive change.” En route, the Oosterschelde will touch places as far apart as Cape Verde, Rio, Auckland and Tasmania – all spots Darwin reached.

Teenager Adam Swanson spent the past two years cycling solo around the world

 Swanson has spent the past two years riding around 20 countries around the world, including Nepal.

Teenager Adam Swanson spent the past two years cycling around the world.

With no training, Adam and a friend flew to the Netherlands in August 2021, where they would begin their cycling journey. They had no real route plan but cycled their way across to Germany, Belgium, France, Italy, Slovenia, and Croatia. After six months, Henry called it, while Swanson decided to continued on.

CNN »

Now, after a “few years of unconventional education,” cycling across 20 different countries and four continents, Swanson is finally on his way home, and will begin studying at the University of Minnesota in September.

Dick Proenneke thriving alone in the wilderness of Alaska

Dick Proenneke in “Alone in the Wilderness” is the story of Dick Proenneke living at Twin Lakes in the Alaska wilderness.

Dick retired at age 50 in 1967 and decided to build his own cabin on the shore of Twin Lakes. He filmed his adventures so he could show his relatives in the lower 48 states what life was like in Alaska, building his cabin, hunting for food, and exploring the area.

Bob Swerer has used some of the footage from Dick’s films and created 4 videos about Dick, “Alone in the Wilderness”, “Alone in the Wilderness part 2”, “Alaska, Silence and Solitude” and “The Frozen North”. They can purchase from Bob Swerer Productions at the DickProenneke.com website.

Below are some excepts from these films.

Continue reading

65 years ago, Ben Carlin became the world’s first, and still only man, to circumnavigate the Earth in an amphibious vehicle

Ben Carlin and Half Safe arrive in Copenhagen

Ben Carlin and Half Safe arrive in Copenhagen (Source » Wikimedia / Public Domain)

Ben Carlin traveled over 17,780 kilometres (11,050 mi) by sea and 62,744 kilometres (38,987 mi) by land during the ten-year journey.  Arriving in Montreal on May 1958, he had passed through 38 countries and two oceans, with the entire trip costing him around $35,000.

Born in Western Australia, he got the idea for his adventure during his time in the Madras sappers of the Indian Army engineers during World War II, but it began in America.

More at Wikipedia »

Fellow adventurer Dan Grec recently found Carlin’s Half-Safe on display at the Guildford Grammar School in Western Australia.

The Roaming Yak finds himself on a long hard desert slog, only to end up in paradise

At the beginning of the covid pandemic lockdowns, Darrin found himself in Namibia.

Along the way, he started filming his adventures and wildlife he encountered and “somehow have amassed 25 Terabytes of 4K footage shot on 5 different cameras.”

He has started a YouTube series where he shares some of his footage and recounts his wonderful solo adventures during isolation. Below is his latest episode.

You too can follow along and subscribe to his YouTube channel.

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