Inspiration for the Adventure Traveller

Category: Adventure (Page 1 of 16)

Camping on crown land is free to Canadian residents for up to 21 days on any one site

Get Out There Magazine »

Basically, crown land is owned by the federal or provincial government. In Canada, 41 per cent of land is federal crown land and 48 per cent is provincial crown land.

Anyone camping on crown land needs to follow local rules regarding fishing, campfires and allowable recreational activities. As long as the land is not licensed for another purpose or designated for another use or anything like that, it is fair game. But, the trick is finding it.

For example, the provincial government in Ontario publishes a Crown Land Use Policy Atlas. Another good option is to search for conservation reserves or provincial parks that are non-operating. There are many resources online that can pinpoint specific areas.

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83 year-old Kenichi Horie sets record for the oldest person to sail solo and nonstop across the Pacific Ocean

Sixty years ago, in 1962, Kenichi Horie was the first person to sail the Pacific Ocean solo and nonstop.

The Japanese adventurer has achieved a number of other long distance solo voyages, including sailing around the world in 1974.

Nikkei Asia »

Well-known Japanese yachtsman Kenichi Horie, 83, arrived on June 4 off the Kii Peninsula in western Japan after crossing the Pacific, becoming the oldest person to sail solo and nonstop across the world’s largest body of water.

Horie set sail from San Francisco on March 26 on a voyage lasting 69 days. The trip, which covered about 8,700 km, went relatively smoothly. But he had to battle through bad weather at times, sailing into a storm and high seas immediately after leaving San Francisco. In his online diary, he wrote, “Can’t do anything but wait for it to pass.” In a later entry, he simply wrote: “I’m fed up.”

Associated Press »

It was the latest achievement for the octogenarian adventurer, who in 1962 became the first person in the world to successfully complete a solo nonstop voyage across the Pacific from Japan to San Francisco.

Sixty years later, he traveled the opposite route.

Elsewhere » The Guardain / AFP / CNN /

Alexandra David-Neel –Traveler, Opera Singer, Monk, Free Spirit

Alexandra David-Neel

Alexandra David-Neel (via Explorersweb.com)

In 1924, Alexandra David-Neel, the Paris-born, Buddhist scholar, travel writer, relentless explorer, and former opera singer, crossed the Himalaya in winter to reach the sacred city Lhasa. She became the first European woman to do so.

Explorersweb.com »

On the border of Tibet, at 4,000m, the two lived in a cave between 1914-1917. They braved freezing temperatures and scrounged for food. They spent most of their time meditating. Twice, they attempted to infiltrate the forbidden city of Lhasa in disguise.

Tibet was a common beacon for foreigners. But the country was strictly closed. David-Neel and Aphur entered illegally and were swiftly expelled.

With World War I at Europe’s doorstep, the pair set off in the opposite direction, first to Japan, then onward to Korea and China. For two years, they translated Tibetan books, living as monks in China’s Kumbum Monastery.

But again, David-Neel was restless. She struggled to stay in one place for long, and Tibet beckoned. She and Aphur set off again to attempt to enter Lhasa. This time, they succeeded.

Bert terHart is Canoeing 7,000Km Across Canada

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63-year old Bert ter Hart is trekking and paddling his canoe across Canada, from west to east, using only a sextant and compass. He’s following routes that Canada’s Indigenous people travelled for thousands of years; they later helped guide the fur traders and explorers like David Thompson. He’s also carrying a petition that seeks to recognize these Indigenous guides.

Learn more about the Bert’s solo adventure at his website.

Neal Moore crossed the US by canoe » a 22-month 7,500-mile journey from coast to coast

Photo of Neal Moore in a 16-foot red Old Town Penobscot canoe on a river in the wilderness

Photo: Neal Moore (via Explorersweb)

Corey Kilgannon / NY Times 🔒 »

Mr. Moore began in the Columbia River in Oregon, crossed several northern states and traveled down to the Gulf Coast by last winter. By early 2021, he was headed back up to the Great Lakes and to New York State, where he followed the Erie Canal to the Hudson River and ultimately to the Statue of Liberty.

“I wanted to see the country up close and personal at this interesting time, with the pandemic and all the political strife, to find out what it actually means to be American today,” Mr. Moore said.

“I felt like I followed that light shining all the way across the country,” he said later. “My journey was one of illumination. So to finally see that beacon up close, that flame of liberty, after seeing it in so many people I met across this land, it was overwhelming.”

Traveling by river became metaphoric: Just as rivers connect towns and cities, Mr. Moore said, he began exploring connections between people often separated by race, class and political stripe.

Elsewhere » 22 Rivers / Explorersweb / Adventure Journal

Mark Delstanche rows solo from New York City to London

Rebecca McPhee, Explorersweb »

Mark Delstanche, 47, has become the first person to solo row from New York to London. He set off from Battery Park, New York on June 14, and after 97 days he crossed the finish line at Tower Bridge, London. Since the beginning, Delstanche has faced complications. His boat Square Peg was custom-made with a flywheel-powered propeller, which broke early in his journey. He then rowed through some of the worst weather in years. Over the three months, he endured eight major storms and seven capsizes. The storms damaged most of his electronic equipment. During one capsize, he twisted his knee.

On this day » British adventurer Sir Francis Chichester, who sailed around the world alone in 1966–67 on the 55-foot (17-metre) yacht Gipsy Moth IV, was born.

Sir Francis Chichester (Sep 17, 1901 – Aug 26, 1972)

Sir Francis Chichester

Sir Francis Chichester

Britannica »

On his around-the-world voyage, he left Plymouth August 27, 1966, sailing the 14,100 miles to Sydney in 107 days. Embarking again on Jan. 29, 1967, he returned to Plymouth around Cape Horn in 119 days, the 15,517 miles being the longest passage made by a small sailing vessel without a port of call. He was knighted in May 1967 by Queen Elizabeth II. His last solo voyage in January–February 1971, from Portuguese Guinea to Nicaragua, covered 4,000 miles in 22 days. He died shortly after illness in 1972 prevented him from making the solo transatlantic race. His books include the autobiography The Lonely Sea and the Sky (1964) and The Gipsy Moth Circles the World (1967).

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